Difference between revisions of "Biography Repository"

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Dr. Brothers has worked with BioVU, Vanderbilt University’s opt-out biorepository, as an co-investigator looking at issues related to research ethics and community engagement. He is also a lead investigator with a Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) project funded by NHGRI. This project examines issues related to return of results in pediatric clinical sequencing.
 
Dr. Brothers has worked with BioVU, Vanderbilt University’s opt-out biorepository, as an co-investigator looking at issues related to research ethics and community engagement. He is also a lead investigator with a Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) project funded by NHGRI. This project examines issues related to return of results in pediatric clinical sequencing.
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===2014-08===
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Kyle Brothers, M.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Louisville, where he is also affiliated with the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy, and Law. His work focuses on improving humanistic, person-centered outcomes in healthcare systems increasingly marked by technological tools, and more specifically the implications of using genome-scale sequencing for clinical care. He studies the implications of these technologies for healthcare professionals, patients and their family members, as well as the overall impact of these tools on the quality of healthcare. In one current project he is examining the implications of sequencing technologies for families seeking a genetic diagnosis for their child’s developmental disability. Dr. Brothers also studies research ethics issues related to genomic biorepositories and other types of genomic research. His work related to these aims utilizes four methodologies: (1) policy analysis, (2) conceptual analysis, (3) survey methods, and (4) qualitative research methods.
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Topics of Interest:
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Research Ethics
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#Return of Genomic Research Results and Research Participant Preferences
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#Informed Consent for Pediatric Genomic Research
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#Sharing of Data from Genomic Biorepositories
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#Non-Consent Models of Biorepository Research
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Clinical Ethics
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#Utility of Genetic Diagnosis for Children with Disabilities
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#Impact of Clinical Sequencing on Clinical Decision-Making of Primary Care Practitioners
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#Impact of Clinical Sequencing on Uncertainty, Healthcare Utilization, and Health Behaviors of Pediatric and Adult Patients

Revision as of 16:08, 20 August 2014

This document contains bios for various uses.

NIH

Clinical Pediatrics or Clinical Ethics Focused

2008-12

Kyle Brothers joined Vanderbilt University’s Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society in July 2008 with an appointment as Instructor in the Department of Pediatrics. Within the Center, his work focuses on clinical ethics and the ethics of genetic research. His current research seeks to use the lens of virtue ethics to explore clinical decision making, including conscientious objection, end-of-life care, and family-provider conflict. He serves on the Clinical Ethics Consultation Service and the Hospital Ethics Committee. Dr. Brothers is a pediatrician and practices in the Division of General Pediatrics at Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital, with interests in preventive medicine and childhood obesity. Prior to joining the faculty in 2008, Dr. Brothers served as Chief Resident for Pediatrics. Dr. Brothers is also a graduate student in the Graduate Department of Religion. His graduate studies are oriented broadly within religious and philosophical ethics traditions, but with a focus on how these traditions inform contemporary medical practice. As an undergraduate, Brothers’ studies were divided among Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Religious Studies. He received his Bachelor’s degree, magna cum laude, from Centre College of Kentucky (BS, 2000). In 2004 he received his Doctor of Medicine degree, magna cum laude, from the University of Louisville School of Medicine. He completed his residency training in Pediatrics at Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital in 2007.

2010-07

Kyle Brothers, M.D., is an Instructor in the Department of Pediatrics and the Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society. An honors graduate of Centre College and the University of Louisville School of Medicine, he completed postgraduate training in Pediatrics at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt, where he also served as Chief Resident in Pediatrics. Dr. Brothers is a PhD student in Vanderbilt’s Graduate Department of Religion, where he studies the philosophical foundations for clinical and research ethics. He serves as a sub-investigator in the eMERGE (electronic MEdical Records and GEnomics) network, and serves as an ethics consultant for Vanderbilt’s genomic biorepository, BioVU, and Vanderbilt’s clinical pharmacogenomics effort, PREDICT. Dr. Brothers is a pediatrician and practices in the area of pediatric weight management in the Division of General Pediatrics.

2014-07

Kyle Brothers, M.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Louisville, where he is also affiliated with the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy, and Law. His research work focuses on the ethics of genetic research and the translation of genomic technologies into clinical care. Dr. Brothers is a pediatrician and practices medicine in pediatric primary care. Dr. Brothers has extensive experience as a clinical ethics consultant, and currently serves on the ethics committee of Kosair Children’s Hospital. He is currently completing a PhD in Ethics and Society in the Graduate Department of Religion at Vanderbilt. Dr. Brothers received his Bachelor’s degree from Centre College of Kentucky and his Doctor of Medicine degree from the University Of Louisville School Of Medicine. He completed his residency training and chief residency in Pediatrics at Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital in 2008.

2014-07

Kyle Brothers, M.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Louisville, where he is also affiliated with the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy, and Law. His research work focuses on the ethics of genetic research and the translation of genomic technologies into clinical care. Dr. Brothers is a pediatrician and practices medicine in pediatric primary care. Dr. Brothers is also an experienced clinical ethics consultant, and currently serves on the ethics committee of Kosair Children’s Hospital. Dr. Brothers received his Doctor of Medicine degree from the University Of Louisville School Of Medicine, and completed his residency training and chief residency in Pediatrics at Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital. He is currently completing a PhD in Ethics and Society in the Graduate Department of Religion at Vanderbilt.

Genomics Focused

2009-12

Kyle Brothers, M.D. is an Instructor in the Department of Pediatrics and the Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society at Vanderbilt University. He works on ethical and social issues related to genome-based biorepositories, including issues specific to pediatric biobanks. He is the ethics reviewer for Vanderbilt University’s DNA biorepository, BioVU, and has conducted research on parental attitudes toward BioVU’s pediatric expansion. Dr. Brothers is a member of the eMERGE (Electronic Medical Records and Genomics) consortium Consent and Community Consultation Committee and Return of Results Oversight Committee. Dr. Brothers also works in the area of clinical ethics. His research in this area relates to virtue ethics perspectives on clinical decision making, including conscientious objection, end-of-life care, and family-provider conflict. He serves on Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s Clinical Ethics Consultation Service and Hospital Ethics Committee. Dr. Brothers is a pediatrician and practices in the Division of General Pediatrics at Vanderbilt Children´s Hospital, with interests in preventive medicine and childhood obesity. He is also a PhD student in the Graduate Department of Religion, where he studies religious and philosophical ethics traditions, with a focus on how these traditions inform contemporary medical practice. He received his Bachelor´s degree from Centre College of Kentucky and his Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Louisville School of Medicine. He completed residency and chief residency in Pediatrics at Vanderbilt Children´s Hospital.

2013-03

Kyle Brothers, M.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Louisville, where he is also affiliated with the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy, and Law. His work focuses on the ethics of genetic research and the translation of genomic technologies into clinical care. He has worked closely with colleagues at Vanderbilt University on the ethical and regulatory implications of the opt-out biobank BioVU. Dr. Brothers is a pediatrician and practices medicine in both pediatric primary care and pediatric weight management. Dr. Brothers is currently completing a PhD in Ethics and Society in the Graduate Department of Religion at Vanderbilt. His graduate studies have focused on philosophies of medical practice and scientific epistemology, and the implications of these fields of knowledge to medical practice in the “Era of Personalized Medicine.” Dr. Brothers received his Bachelor’s degree from Centre College of Kentucky and his Doctor of Medicine degree from the University Of Louisville School Of Medicine. He completed his residency training and chief residency in Pediatrics at Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital in 2008.

2013-04

Dr. Brothers is a general pediatrician who has completed a Clinical Ethics fellowship and will soon receive his PhD in Religious studies. He has worked in the past with the development of pediatric biobanks and the clinical implementation of pharmacogenetic testing. He has published manuscripts of his qualitative and quantitative research in the field as well as perspective pieces regarding biobanking and pharmacogenetic testing as well. He currently serves as an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Kosair Charities Pediatric Clinical Research Unit at the University of Louisville.

2014-01

Dr. Brothers has worked with BioVU, Vanderbilt University’s opt-out biorepository, as an co-investigator looking at issues related to research ethics and community engagement. He is also a lead investigator with a Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) project funded by NHGRI. This project examines issues related to return of results in pediatric clinical sequencing.

2014-08

Kyle Brothers, M.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Louisville, where he is also affiliated with the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy, and Law. His work focuses on improving humanistic, person-centered outcomes in healthcare systems increasingly marked by technological tools, and more specifically the implications of using genome-scale sequencing for clinical care. He studies the implications of these technologies for healthcare professionals, patients and their family members, as well as the overall impact of these tools on the quality of healthcare. In one current project he is examining the implications of sequencing technologies for families seeking a genetic diagnosis for their child’s developmental disability. Dr. Brothers also studies research ethics issues related to genomic biorepositories and other types of genomic research. His work related to these aims utilizes four methodologies: (1) policy analysis, (2) conceptual analysis, (3) survey methods, and (4) qualitative research methods.

Topics of Interest: Research Ethics

  1. Return of Genomic Research Results and Research Participant Preferences
  2. Informed Consent for Pediatric Genomic Research
  3. Sharing of Data from Genomic Biorepositories
  4. Non-Consent Models of Biorepository Research

Clinical Ethics

  1. Utility of Genetic Diagnosis for Children with Disabilities
  2. Impact of Clinical Sequencing on Clinical Decision-Making of Primary Care Practitioners
  3. Impact of Clinical Sequencing on Uncertainty, Healthcare Utilization, and Health Behaviors of Pediatric and Adult Patients